What Every Girl Should Know

Simone Meltesen makes art. This is her general interest tumblr (mostly feminism and cats).

Today is Racist Fuckery (10.20.14): At yesterday’s protest outside the St Louis Rams game, racist fans got rowdy and physical. Who got arrested? Two of the protesters, of course. Mike Brown means we have to fight back. #staywoke

(Source: socialjusticekoolaid, via dontevengetmestarted)

The story of Cassandra, the woman who told the truth but was not believed, is not nearly as embedded in our culture as that of the Boy Who Cried Wolf—that is, the boy who was believed the first few times he told the same lie. Perhaps it should be.

—In her cover essay on silencing women in the October 2014 issue of Harper’s, Rebecca Solnit once again proves that she is one of our era’s greatest essayist – further evidence here and here. (via explore-blog)

(via soniasaraiya)

I’ve told the kids in the ghettos that violence won’t solve their problems, but then they ask me, and rightly so; “Why does the government use massive doses of violence to bring about the change it wants in the world?” After this I knew that I could no longer speak against the violence in the ghettos without also speaking against the violence of my government

Martin Luther King Jr. (via loveinfamine)

The ~*real*~ Dr. King— the one white people don’t want you to know about.

(via the-uncensored-she)

(via ripittoshreds)

amaditalks:

zorascreation:

gowns:

josé julio sarria, gay latino who ran for public office in 1961 - many many years before harvey milk

he ran for the san francisco board of supervisors and almost won by default, until people noticed there was a gay man running and immediately submitted everyone possible for the position. he didn’t win, but he still got 6000 votes, which shocked conservatives
he was also a drag queen popular at many of the balls at the time…and he still does it today (lookin good for a guy in his late 80s)!


It’s so funny how White “Queerstorians” conveniently never tell us about this beautiful querido right here. <3 

Know your full queer, not-whitewashed, history!
[Image description: Photo one is a black and white photo of Sarria that appears to be from the 1960s, he’s wearing a light-colored strapless gown, dangling earrings, a long necklace and gold bracelet, and is combing his hair while looking into a hand mirror. Photo two is a formal portrait of Sarria in dark suit and tie, as candidate for San Francisco Supervisor. Photo three is Sarria in the present, in a red updo wig, with a rhinestone tiara, and a red gown with matching embroidered jacket, long necklaces, one with an elaborate rhinestone pendant, long dangling earrings and a shade of red lipstick matching the gown flawlessly.]

amaditalks:

zorascreation:

gowns:

josé julio sarria, gay latino who ran for public office in 1961 - many many years before harvey milk

image

he ran for the san francisco board of supervisors and almost won by default, until people noticed there was a gay man running and immediately submitted everyone possible for the position. he didn’t win, but he still got 6000 votes, which shocked conservatives

he was also a drag queen popular at many of the balls at the time…and he still does it today (lookin good for a guy in his late 80s)!

image

It’s so funny how White “Queerstorians” conveniently never tell us about this beautiful querido right here. <3 

Know your full queer, not-whitewashed, history!

[Image description: Photo one is a black and white photo of Sarria that appears to be from the 1960s, he’s wearing a light-colored strapless gown, dangling earrings, a long necklace and gold bracelet, and is combing his hair while looking into a hand mirror. Photo two is a formal portrait of Sarria in dark suit and tie, as candidate for San Francisco Supervisor. Photo three is Sarria in the present, in a red updo wig, with a rhinestone tiara, and a red gown with matching embroidered jacket, long necklaces, one with an elaborate rhinestone pendant, long dangling earrings and a shade of red lipstick matching the gown flawlessly.]

(via twssonline)

garconniere:

derica:

Bande de Filles / Girlhood (2014) dir. Céline Sciamma starring Karidja Toure, Assa Sylla, Lindsay Karamoh, Marietou Toure

A few weeks ago I watched 17 Filles, a film directed by Muriel Coulin based on the myth surrounding the “Gloucester 18”, a group of girls from the same US high school who got pregnant within the same year. A TIME reporter claimed that the girls had made a pact to get pregnant at the same time, maybe as a form of rebellion. Although that was later debunked, the film - set in France - is based on the fiction.

The only glimpse of a black girl in Coulin’s film is during a wide establishing shot in the playground of the school the girls attend. The girl is being (playfully?) kicked in the butt by a white girl. Since it’s an establishing shot, we’re not really meant to care what’s happening in the scene, it’s just a way of letting us know that the characters who matter have decided to go to school that day. 

This is basically standard practice in the (bougie) French films I regularly subject myself to (Claire Denis is the obvious exception), and that’s one  reason I wanna see Sciamma’s new film Girlhood. The film is getting good reviews (this one especially although I don’t read French so there are definitely more) and Sciamma also seems aware of how messed up that absence is: “It was part of the thrill of making the movie, and the will to make the movie, because [black girls] are invisible on the screen”  

"This country doesn’t give them a vision of what they could be, what they could do. Still, they are so strong and intelligent and it’s an incredible youth in France that we have."

&

"I wanted the movie to avoid the cliches of a suburban movie, you know, documentary-like with the camera on the shoulder. I wanted it to be wide and stylish. And so we decided to shoot the movie in cinemascope. Also so that we could shoot the four girls all in the same frame. And to shoot suburbia in a charismatic way."

&

"They’re not gangs in the US sense of the word; just big groups of friends… They face a particular set of challenges but at the same their stories are consistent with the themes I’ve explored in my other work such as the construction of feminine identity and friendships between girls… the film is basically a coming-of-age tale.

I cannot wait to see this.

Me too!